Category: Meet the Performers

Making the ’90s Magically Delicious: Lucky Charming

Making the ’90s Magically Delicious: Lucky Charming

FB: Lucky Charming Boylesk
IG: mrluckycharming
Twitter: @MrLuckyCharming

Friends!

We are just four days away from the Boston incarnation of Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque and we have one more new performer to introduce you to. Meet Lucky Charming, the boy-band aficionado who will rock your body right.

After finding his roots in New York City, Lucky Charming​ ​recently relocated to Boston, where he joined forces​ ​with the local all­-male troupe, Sirlesque. He is also a proud​ ​member of the White Elephant Burlesque Society, and a​ ​four­​-​time GLAM Award nominee for Best Burlesque among NYC’s gay nightlife.

1. What is your favorite thing about the 1990s?
Absolutely, positively the music. I heard recently on a (very non-scientific) podcast that the music you experience when you are 13 years old will always feel like the best era of music. To this day, I am still a sucker for ’90s boy-bands. And I didn’t appreciate them so much in their prime, but the alternative rock bands of that era also hold a very special place for me.

Honorable mention: Disney Afternoon.

Photo: Rex Lott

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?
It would have to be one of the Backstreet Boys, although I’m not entirely sure which one. A.J. would undoubtedly have the most interesting stories to tell, but Howie has always been the quiet one and I’m certain he’s seen some shit.

3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the 90s?
There are so many iconic artists and personalities from the ’90s that are still around and kickin’. Some are continuing to milk their popularity from 20 years ago (like the New Kids on the Block), some have managed to be genuinely successful this entire time (Britney Spears), and some have completely reinvented themselves and re-emerged from the ashes of their former career (former MTV VJ Dave Holmes). I applaud and bow to members of each one of these camps.

Come see Lucky and the rest of our magical lineup on October 7 at The Rockwell, 255 Elm Street, Somerville, MA, 02144. Doors open at 9:30. A portion of proceeds will benefit The Hispanic Federation to help with hurricane and earthquake relief.

Fifties Fashion and Glamour with Elsa Riot and Pearl Buttons

Fifties Fashion and Glamour with Elsa Riot and Pearl Buttons

You guys! It’s already Thursday and that means we are just over a week away from our Decadent debut in Boston. We thought you’d like to meet two more Boston-based performers, Elsa Riot and Pearl Buttons, the dynamic duo who will be putting the FAB in ’50s.

Elsa Riot

Web: elsariot.com
FB: ElsaRiot
IG: elsa.riot

Elsa is producer, curator, and host of Somerville’s premier variety show Smoke & Shadows and the monthly midnight vaudeville pop-up Top Shelf Burlesque.

Pearl Buttons

Web: pearlbuttonsburlesque.com
FB: Pearl Buttons
IG: pearl_buttons

Pearl has been dancing classical ballet and American jazz since she was three, and melds her dance roots with a love for Old Hollywood and all things sparkly to achieve a truly spectacular stage presence.

Elsa and Pearl encapsulate the glamour of classic burlesque, adding a twist of their own earnest charm and signature doofy grins – perfect representatives for the 1950s’ simple luxury and cool-headed quirk!

Let’s learn more about them…

1. What is your favorite thing about the 1950s?
Elsa: The “Beat Generation” counterculture. The 1950s stand out as a stringent time in American history that wanted to see conformity and consumerism from citizens more than anything else. That pressure gave way to interesting and radical movements, styles, culture, and politics – these were the first echoes of sexual liberation, pacifism, anti-capitalism, the end of segregation, rock & roll, and so on. Our act for this show communicates a sexual transformation that mirrors the rejection of traditional 1950s homemaking in favor of freedom and sensuality.

Pearl: Movie musicals. The beginning Cold War meant that this decade was a terrifying time for a lot of Americans and I think the escapism that lighthearted films offered was really important and continues to be now.

Photo: Striker Posie

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?
Elsa: Marlene Dietrich! She was a sharp and fearless woman in every sense. She was a brilliant variety performer and a sharp businesswoman. She exuded glamour with flawless makeup and the slinkiest dresses and would still put on a top hat and tails to sing songs written for men. She owned her sexuality and laughed in the face of criticism from American churches. She was politically outspoken and anti-war, and as a German during WWII condemned the Nazi party and mobilized with other American stars to help Jews and dissidents escape Europe. And her impeccable style is all over my Pinterest boards. I think she would be amazing to learn from and laugh with over drinks!

Pearl: Probably Charles James. He’s described as “America’s first couturier” and Christian Dior credited him with inspiring the New Look. His designs were so amazingly structured and impeccably tailored. The Met costume institute did a display of his work and showed the inner structure of some of his most famous gowns and it was so fascinating. James also created the “taxi dress,” which was designed to be so easy you could slip it on in the back of a taxi. I love when couture designers also create work that is practical and wearable. He designed right up until his death and that passion for your art is so important. I’m a total tailoring geek and I’d love to discuss technique with him over coffee

3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the 1950s?
Elsa: Today’s politics certainly ring familiar to the McCarthyist vibes of the 1950s, but to look at the brighter and more forward-thinking side of the ’50s, I often think about Michelle Obama as the new Jackie O. At first glance she’s a paragon of what is expected of American women – a good mother, supportive wife, smart and attractive but not intimidatingly so – but is in fact strong, independent, glamorous, accomplished, and spirited all on her own. They both stand out as First Ladies who excelled in the public eye, shifted American culture, and left a legacy separate from their husbands.

Photo: Striker Posie

Pearl: I definitely agree with Elsa on Michelle Obama. I think her grace under pressure is remarkable. I admire her ability to balance the traditional role of a first lady while being an incredible political force in her own right. They also both know how to seriously rock a sheath dress.

Come see Elsa, Pearl and the rest of our magical lineup on October 7 at The Rockwell, 255 Elm Street, Somerville, MA, 02144. Doors open at 9:30. A portion of proceeds will benefit The Hispanic Federation to help with hurricane and earthquake relief.

READ MORE ABOUT THE 1950s HERE.

Jazzing up the 1920s: Harley Foxx

Jazzing up the 1920s: Harley Foxx

FB: Harley Foxx
IG: harleyfoxxburlesque

Hello friends,

As you know, we are taking Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque to Boston next month, so we thought we’d take a moment to introduce you to the fabulous performers who will be joining us.

First up, meet Harley Foxx, who will rep the 1920s. This swing and jazz aficionado shares some of her favorite things about this glamorous decade, including her love for the iconic Josephine Baker.

1. What is your favorite thing about the 1920s?
My favorite thing about this era is defined by the music and the dancing. My mother used to play Duke Ellington and Count Basie records, and she sang Billie Holiday around our house. As I got older I started swing dancing and it became even more infused into my soul.

I really love listening to “hot jazz” music, and those old syncopated rhythms. I have gradually been building this collection of swing music and I am totally amazed and humbled by the never-ending wealth of great music just waiting to be heard.

But aside from that, as a DJ I like to play whatever I think will keep people dancing – whether it’s chunky, up-tempo, or even contemporary swing. Some of my favorite artists include the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, Chick Webb, Django Reinhardt, Mildred Bailey, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Fats Waller (of course), Bob Crosby, as well as Wingy Manone. My love for both the music and dance are something that I try to share with everyone in my life.

Photo: Veronica Tays

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be?
I would love to sit down with the great Josephine Baker.

She had an independent spirit and had to learn to provide for herself and make her own way. This free and bold behavior led her to perform across the country and eventually she was able to sashay away to the Paris stage during the 1920s.

She was confident in her abilities and performed with a comic, yet sensual appeal that took Europe by storm. She had a perfect blend and I try to embody her character and flair in some of my pieces. Baker went on to perform and choreograph for 50 years in Europe.

Although racism in the States often restricted her from gaining the same fame at home as she did abroad, Baker fought segregation through organizations like NAACP. I would love to chat with her about where we are now in entertainment, burlesque and politics. Things are different from the 1920’s but I definitely feel like she would be a great mentor and be able to offer some insight and guidance.

Photo: Mandi Martini

3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the 1920s?
Beyoncé is a great pop superstar who isn’t afraid of celebrating black brilliance and has often given nods to the black women performers who’ve inspired her. Beyoncé has paid tribute to Tina Turner and in 2006, she celebrated Jospehine Baker.

Beyoncé’s affinity for Baker comes as no surprise. Baker’s control of her art and her image were unprecedented for her time. Baker, a black woman beloved by white audiences, built her name by working within the status quo to transgress social boundaries. In her later life she became a civil rights activist.

Beyoncé does the same. Beyonce has also been able to navigate a space that tended to exclude (or at the very least limit) black women for a long time. Mainstream music and pop music specifically. Her album Formation made a lot of people realize how political and “woke” Beyoncé is. But she has always given nods in her music and videos on where she stands, her support to the artists who came before her, and her black culture.

Josephine baker and Beyoncé are two artists I love and admire and the fact it’s their blackness that makes them unique. I have found I don’t have to separate the blackness from the art. If you want to participate, indulge, be entertained, you must acknowledge black lives and black issues in the process. That is what they do and what I hope to do too.

Come see Harley and the rest of our magical lineup on October 7 at The Rockwell, 255 Elm Street, Somerville, MA, 02144. Doors open at 9:30. A portion of proceeds will benefit The Hispanic Federation to help with hurricane and earthquake relief.

READ MORE ABOUT THE 1920s HERE.

 

Get your Groove On with Munroe Lilly

Get your Groove On with Munroe Lilly

Munroe Lilly is the ’70s’ ‘hair’ apparent!

Instagram: munroelilly
Facebook
: Munroe Lilly

It’s the ’70s and that means it’s time to do a little dance, make a little love and, obviously, get down tonight. Munroe Lilly is here and wants to get down with you. Won’t you join him?

1. What is your favorite thing about the ’70s?

I love the ’70s for the clothes, hair and the overall vibe. It was about free love, peace, happiness, and fighting war through music and protest. Add in the psychedelic drugs and you have basically the perfect decade.

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?

Honestly, I would love to have drinks with a lot of people from that decade. ’70s-era Diana Ross, Cher, and Tina turner. Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, David Bowie. And on and on… they all encompass/ed a specific kind of strength that I identify with and that’s having the courage to do and be exactly who they want to be both on and off the stage. They all were/are so electric as performers and yet were/are complicated people. I see a lot of myself in all of them.

3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the ’70s?

My very good friend Lillian! (who happens to be the ‘Lilly’ in Munroe Lilly.) She’s such a gentle spirit. I call her my bohemian goddess. She has a great deal of that specific kind of courage that I admire. She does what she wants and on her terms with an air of beauty, truth, and love.

Come see Munroe Lilly, the “Black diamond: Rare and Beautiful” at the Triad on 4/22. TICKETS! 

The ’60s: To Hellz and Back

The ’60s: To Hellz and Back

Hellz Kitten channels Betty Draper
Instagram: @hellzkittennyc
Websitehellzkitten.com

 The ’60s were explosive, uprooting everything from music to art to fashion to politics and taking us from the staid ’50s to the “anything goes” ’70s. Hellz Kitten is obsessed with the ’60s, so who better to represent this debaucherous decade?

 1. What is your favorite thing about the ’60s?
I love everything about the ’60s, from the clothes to the music. I like how the decade started out buttoned up and conservative, but by the end, all bets were off and YOLO was the name of the game. I mean it probably wasn’t good for society, but it looks like a lot of fun.
 
2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?
Well, Don Draper, obviously, since I’m obsessed with Mad Men and because despite all his faults, he’s a gentleman who knows how to treat a lady (at least in the moment).
Cheers
 But I’d also like to get into Jim Morrison’s leather pants.

Or maybe a young(ish) Marlon Brando (although he’d probably bore you death with his causes all night).

Meow

I’d love to see Janis Joplin live.

Badass

And maybe someone who could teach me how to do a cat-eye properly.

3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the ’60s?
I’m hopeless about today’s pop culture, unless Wendy Williams is talking about on Hot Topics. But there are a lot of songs on my “Hipster Cocktail Party” Pandora station that sound kinda neo-groovy, so I’ll go with that.
Come get groovy with Hellz Kitten on April 22 at The Triad.
Click HERE to buy tickets for Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque
Rock and roll with Shimmy LeCoeur

Rock and roll with Shimmy LeCoeur

Shimmy LeCoeur
Shimmy LeCoeur

Instagram: @shimmi13

The ’50s was a transformational decade, taking us from war and depression to a more fun, forward-looking youth culture that would dominate the second half of the 20th century. Nothing illustrates that more than the rise of rock and roll. And who better to shake, rattle and roll for you than Shimmy LeCoeur?

1. What is your favorite thing about the ’50s? 

My favorite thing is how the music changed and transformed a generation to rock’n’roll lovers. It was an awakening of the senses and showed just how music could change the world.

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?

I’d love to have dinner with Elvis Presley and have him sing for me. Wouldn’t it be amazing g to really see how he feels about changing music and becoming the real king of rock’n’roll?

It would indeed!

Come see Shimmy up close and personal on April 22 for Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque. Tickets are ON SALE for this fantastic journey to the ’50s and beyond, so buy yours today!

TICKETS

Oh L’amour! Spicing up the ’40s

Oh L’amour! Spicing up the ’40s

Some like it hot

FB: spicylamour
Instagram: @spicylamour
Website: bloodsweatandtease.com

Despite war raging across the globe, the ’40s conjure up images of romance, intrigue and danger – the perfect rôle for a femme fatale. And who better to personify that than our own Spicy L’amour. Her name alone suggests passion, heat and drama. Pull up a chair and get to know Spicy a little better.

1. What is your favorite thing about the 1940s?

Perhaps it is uncanny that I got to represent the 40s as I just turned 40 in December. 1942 is significant to me, for no other sentimental reason than the year my father was born. And Harrison Ford. Who doesn’t love Han Solo?

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?

Edith Piaf. Her signature song La Vie En Rose was a song I learned in French class, and I sing it to my daughter Artemis (aka Baby Spice) to lull her to sleep. Even though Edith herself led a life full of tragedy and loss, I think she would delight in the fact that her songs have everlasting and international appeal. And we would knock back a shitload of amazing French wine while talking about men and swapping dating horror stories. Like her, I can say, je ne regrette rien!

3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the ’40s?

One person from the era who showed some serious girl power was Eleanor Roosevelt, so I guess I would pick Michelle Obama as an example of that. And Michelle herself has said that Eleanor was one of her inspirations, especially her idea to have a Victory Garden in every household during the war.

Come see Spicy sizzle on April 22 for Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque. She joins a fabulous lineup of sultry stunners who will take you on a whirlwind tour through time. Tickets are on sale now!

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See the ’30s through Ruby-Colored Glasses

See the ’30s through Ruby-Colored Glasses

Ruby embodies ’30s glamour

Instagram: @ruby_mechant

The ever-glamorous Ruby Mechant will be on hand to rep the ’30s for Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque on April 22.

We spoke with her to learn a little about how she connects with her decade.

1. What is your favorite thing about the 1930s? 
For sure the fashion. I mean…have you seen the beautiful dresses, hats and gloves? Super classy.
Some classy ’30s fashion. (To read more about ’30s fashion, click here.)

Another thing that fascinates me about that era is the phenomenon where bank robbers were considered celebrities.

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?
I’m torn between Al Capone, Bonnie and Clyde and Amelia Earhart – I mean Bonnie and Amelia are pretty badass.
3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the 30’s ?
I did a little bit of research, but there is no way you can find beauties like Greta Garbo, Rita Hayworth and Bette Davis.

Ruby is just one of the 21st century beauties you will see at The Triad on April 22, so be sure to check back often – ticket info is coming soon!

 

A ‘Dandy’ Trip Through Time

A ‘Dandy’ Trip Through Time

Dandy Dillinger, Vintage Beauty

FB: dandy.dillinger
IG: @dandydillinger

We are beyond excited for Decadent, our voyage through 100 years of burlesque, on April 22, and we are even more excited to welcome back Dandy Dillinger, who performed with us in our very first show (in 2015!).

Dandy, “burlesque’s ‘man’ about town,” is the perfect choice to represent the 1920s because of her classic, vintage look. She even has the awards to back up her cred, having been voted Miss Art Deco by the Art Deco Society of NY last year.

She is just one of the fabulous performers who will be on hand to send you back in time at the Triad on April 22. Tickets will be on sale soon, so be sure to check back often.

 

Ravenessa Revealed

Ravenessa Revealed

Ravenessa (photo: Will Vaultz)

Instagram: @Ravenessa100
FB: Ravenessa Ravenessa

Introducing the ravishing Ravenessa!

The “Witty Titty from New York City” joins us Saturday at the Met Room for Unleashed: Pilots, Puppies and Pasties, a vaudeville-esque variety show to benefit Pilots to the Rescue.

According to her bio, “Ravenessa is a Texas girl gone Brooklyn. She studied dance and comedy at The Ailey School and the Upright Citizens Brigade. Ravenessa loves creating comedic burlesque pieces and is thrilled to be making her Unleashed debut!”

We are thrilled to have her too!

Ravenessa is just ONE of the badass performers guaranteed to thrill and delight you on Sat, so hurry up and buy those tickets before they sell out!

TICKETS

Unleashed Promo Poster-page-001
Unleashed: Pilots, Puppies and Pasties: $25; Performance is at The Metropolitan Room (34 West 22nd Street, NY, NY 10010, Between 5th & 6th Aves). Call 212.206.0440 or visit MetropolitanRoom.com for more information. Nearest Subways: 23rd Street Station on 1, 2, N, Q, R, F, M, PATH.

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