Category: 1980s

Decadent Photos!

Decadent Photos!

Finally! Here are some photos from Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque. From Dandy Dillinger’s 1920s showgirl fabulosity to Candy Applebottom’s 2010s tribute to staying connected, we traveled through time on Saturday, April 22 and never looked back. Thanks to everyone who came out to The Triad and made the voyage so fantastic.

1920s

Dandy Dillinger kicks us off with an ethereal number reminiscent of a butterfly emerging from its chrysalis.

1930s

Ruby Mechant gives us some 1930s glamour with just a touch of Italian sass.

1940s

Spicy L’amour blows her bugle for the boys “over there.”

1950s

Shimmy LeCoeur shows us the devil in disguise with her tribute to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll.

1960s

Hellz Kitten asks the age-old question, “will you still love me tomorrow?” with a shocking twist at the end.

1970s

Munroe Lilly loves to love us and takes another little piece of our hearts.

1980s

Luscious Lane revisits the Cold War with a “pop” of color.

1990s

Tutu Toussaint gives us montage of the best ’90s hip-hop.

2000s

Twinky Boots takes the red pill with his tribute to the Matrix.

2010s

And finally, Candy Applebottom lights up our world with her sassy futuristic moves.

Behind the scenes:

Photos: Veronica Toone

 

Party Like It’s 1989: The Alabama Slammer

Party Like It’s 1989: The Alabama Slammer

The ’80s was the decade of excess and neon and this did not stop with its cocktails. Why make a drink with one type of liquor when you could make one with ALL the liquors? (Long Island Iced Tea, I’m looking at you.) And who wants boring old vodka or gin when you could have Blue Curaçao or Midori?

Some of us were in high school in the ’80s and we would drink whatever we could get our hands on. Wine coolers. Root beer Schnapps. Seagram’s 7 from our parents’ liquor cabinet smuggled out of the house a saline solution bottle… how else are you going to make it through a football game when your team is 0-7?

Once we got to college, Friday night found us pre-gaming in our dorm with a case of Old Milwaukee before the SAE party, where we’d swallow shot after shot of Malibu, or god help us, Southern Comfort. One of us, to this day, still cannot be in the same room as Southern Comfort. So in honor of our misspent youth, let’s make an Alabama Slammer.

Invented, so the story goes, at the University of Alabama in the mid-’70s, the Slammer is (allegedly?) the signature drink of the Crimson Tide Football team. Roll tide!

Alabama Slammer

Photo: Liquor.com

Ingredients

1 oz Southern Comfort
1 oz Sloe gin
1 oz Amaretto
2 oz Orange juice

Directions

Add all the ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake, and strain into a highball glass filled with fresh ice. Garnish with an orange wheel and a cherry. Or, you know, make a pitcher and drink the whole thing and repeat until you vomit and remain haunted by the smell of SoCo 30 years later.

 

 

Fashion Flashback Friday: The 1980s

Fashion Flashback Friday: The 1980s

When you think of ’80s fashion, you probably think big, bright and bold. There was no one-size-fits-all when it came to style, although most of the clothing seems to have been one size: large. You could be preppy, yuppie, punk, hip-hop – possibly all within one outfit.

Let’s explore some of the trends that made the ’80s the ’80s.

Power Suits

Although the phrase “power suit” conjures images of douche-bros with slicked back hair (oh who are we kidding, we totally have a crush on Gordon Gekko), the power suit was also the uniform of the ’80s working woman, from Diane Keaton to Melanie Griffith (and of course actual non-fictional people).

Get me the head of Darryl Hannah

Made popular by designer Giorgio Armani, the power suit – for both men and women – featured broad shoulders and wide lapels. For men, a crisp shirt with banker stripes, suspenders and a classic silk tie completed the look. Think Gekko of course, but also Judd Nelson in St. Elmo’s Fire or Richard Gere in American Gigolo.

Judd Nelson in St. Elmo’s Fire
Richard Gere: just an American Gigolo

Women’s power suits were apparently aimed making women as sexless as possible, with giant shoulder pads and below-the-knee skirts. Add a high-necked blouse and “pussy bow” and you’re totally ready to pass yourself off as an executive and steal Harrison Ford.

Babies also make great accessories. (Diane Keaton in Baby Boom)
Working Girl Melanie Griffith before the tragic plastic surgery

Athletic Wear

“Athleisure” was a buzzword in 2016, but this trend began in the early ’80s. Track suits, made from polyester and rayon as well as velour made their way off the fields and into the mainstream.

They were also popular among swingers.

The aerobics craze, coupled with the popularity of movies like Fame and Flashdance,  made legwarmers a thing, and these colorful tubes – ideally the same color as your Forenza sweater – could be found on young women from Boston to the Bay Area.

Thanks Jane Fonda

Preppy 

Lisa Birnbach’s 1980 book The Preppy Handbook was intended to skewer the upper middle class, but instead ended up inspiring a trend.

Preppy fashion took its cues from New England prep-schools – think khakis, oxford shirts and sport coats (or blazers for women). Leisure wear included brightly colored pants with little designs and polo shirts. A popped collar was de rigueur.

Michael Bowen and Deborah Foreman show off their Valley Girl Prep

Add some pearl earrings and a little alligator (or polo player) on your breast and you’re all ready to party at Dorrian’s Red Hand.

Clothing was conservatively tailored, but came in bright colors, like pink and Kelly green. Tying a sweater around your neck was not unheard of, and if you happened to be wearing a sweater around your neck while appearing in a high school movie of the period, chances are, you’re the bad guy.

Classic ’80s villains

Punk

Punk traces its beginnings to England in the ’70s, where it was seen as “an intentional rebuttal of the perceived excess and pretension found in mainstream music.” Shorter, unkempt hair and dirty, torn t-shirts paired with jeans and a leather jacket replaced the slick, flashy styles of the disco era.

By the ’80s, Punk music had evolved in both the U.S. and UK and so did its fashion. T-shirts with political slogans and customized leather jackets or denim vests became popular.

Anarchy!

Hair was spiked, sculpted into a mohawk or cut really short.

London Punks
This dude is not fucking around

Body piercings and tattoos were in and the Doc Marten or combat boot adorned most punk feet.

Docs

Designers like Vivienne Westwood, Anna Sui and Jean-Paul Gaultier began to introduce punk elements into their lines, which brought many of the styles into the mainstream.

Vivienne Westwood (far right) and her punk-inspired designs

Hip-Hop

Hip-hop originated among African-American and Latin youth in NYC, L.A., Chicago and other inner cities, each of which contributed its own elements.

In the late ’70s, sportswear brands such as Le Coq Sportif, Kangol, Adidas and Pro-Keds attached themselves to the emerging hip hop scene. Its adherents wore brightly colored track suits, leather bomber jackets and brand name sneakers, such as Pro-Keds, Puma, Converse’s Chuck Taylor All-stars, and Adidas Superstars.

Heavy gold jewelry – chains for men and big earrings for women – became hallmarks of hip-hop fashion. Other popular accessories included bucket hats, nameplates and multiple rings. Luxury brand names like Louis Vuitton, Fendi, Gucci and logos adorned custom-designed tracksuits, jackets and mink coats, made popular in the early ’80s by Dapper Dan, a Harlem-based designer.

Run DMC
Grandmaster Flash
Salt’n’Pepa

Toward the end of the decade, styles began to incorporate traditional African influences, such as the fez, Kente cloth (a textile) hats and kufis (another type of hat). Blousey pants were famously worn by artists like MC Hammer.

Please Hammer, don’t hurt me with your enormous pants

And that wraps up our partial overview of the ’80s fashion scene. We hope you enjoyed it. If you want to learn more, check out the sites below.

retrowaste.com
liketotally80s.com
Wikipedia
complex.com
80sfashion.org

And just for fun, here are some pics of Les Femmes in all their gnarly ’80s glory.

Luscious Lane chilling circa 1986. Oversized Oxford, double socks.
Luscious Lane 1987
Luscious Lane prom pic, 1988
Hellz Kitten looking thrilled for the first day of 8th grade, 1983
Hellz Kitten made it through the year. 8th Grade grad, 1984. Sweet mullet!
Hellz Kitten prom, 1987. Her enthusiasm is overwhelming.
Ruby Mechant (right) and sister, 1986
Ruby looking adorbs in her Popeye shirt, 1983
Ruby Mechant in 1982 – already naked!

Crazy about the ’80s? Come see Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque at The Triad on April 22.  TICKETS

**SPECIAL LIMITED TIME OFFER** Buy one ticket, get the second at half price with promo code BOGO50 until 4/1! BUY 

Throwback Thursday: Burlesque (not really) of the 1980s

Throwback Thursday: Burlesque (not really) of the 1980s

Burlesque of the ’80s? There was no burlesque in the ’80s. There were strip clubs and Porky’s, but no burlesque. But that doesn’t mean there weren’t beautiful, iconic women who would inspire our modern generation of burlesque performers.

Here are some of them.

Click on any pic for more info.

Love is a battlefield, and Pat Benatar was its fiercest warrior.
What says “’80s excess” more than Joan Collins as Dynasty’s Alexis Colby? One look from her and you want throw a drink on yourself.
Oh, poor tragic Whitney Houston. Didn’t we almost have it all?
This controversial 1981 Calvin Klein ad featured a 15-year-old Brooke Shields, who declared that “nothing” came between her and her Calvins.
Gypsies, tramps and thieves…might be hiding in that hair. The ever -fabulous Cher gives us some late ’80s realness. If only we could turn back time.

And then there’s Madonna. Maybe the most iconic star of the decade (the millennium?). You can make fun of her acting, her fake British accent or her penchant for collecting African children, but the fact remains, Madonna IS the 1980s. Here are some of her signature ’80s looks.

The look that started it all – the Lucky Star/Desperately Seeking days.
An homage to Marilyn: Material Girl
Papa, don’t preach – I’m going to be a huge star and we can get the F outta Staten Island.

Want more ’80s? Come see Decadent: 100 Years of Burlesque at The Triad on April 22.  TICKETS

**SPECIAL LIMITED TIME OFFER** Buy one ticket, get the second at half price with promo code BOGO50 until 4/1! BUY 

A ‘Luscious’ Trip Down Memory ‘Lane’

A ‘Luscious’ Trip Down Memory ‘Lane’

Instagram: lusciouslanenyc
Facebook
: Luscious Lane NYC
Twitter: @lane_luscious

Ohmigod, it’s like, totally the ’80s already! Brush off your shoulder pads and Rubik’s Cube, crank up your boombox and let’s get to know our ’80s lady: Luscious Lane.

1. What is your favorite thing about the 1980s? 
I’m a child of the ’80s and some habits are hard to break! Everything had to match: your shoes, top, socks, scrunchie… I still catch myself doing this today, well, minus the scrunchies! I still love the music and I can count on ’80s music to turn my mood around if I need it.

2. If you could have drinks/dinner with any person from that era, real or fictional, who would it be and why?
Easy, Jake Ryan from Sixteen Candles. But only if he picks me up in his red Porsche.

Michael Schoeffling as Jake Ryan in Sixteen Candles. Call us, Jake!

3. Is there anyone from today you think embodies the idea of the 1980s?
I still think Madonna embodies the ’80s. She helped shape the decade and so many teenage girls like myself, who wore fishnet tops, black rubber bracelets up their arm and wanted to roll around on gondolas in Venice.

Still got it: ’80s It Girl Madonna

Come experience (or relive) the ’80s with Luscious Lane on April 22 at The Triad. Need tickets? Click here!

**SPECIAL LIMITED TIME OFFER** Buy one ticket, get the second at half price with promo code BOGO50 until 4/1! Totally tubular! BUY

Decadent - 1980s - LusciousLane